Theme Of Jealousy In Othello

Saturday, October 9, 2021 6:28:27 PM

Theme Of Jealousy In Othello



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Othello by William Shakespeare - Themes

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Last month, our free practice tests were taken over , times and we received 2,, page views from , unique visitors. We have example essays about every essay topic - K of them!! This website is not endorsed or approved by ETS. This website is not endorsed or approved by The Psychological Corporation. Word Lists essential words to build the vocabulary you need. Essay and Research Paper Resources. Iago mentions the promotion to Roderigo, to convince him that he hates Othello; but Iago also cites his suspicions that Emilia and Othello have had an affair as another reason for his enmity. But, at the same time, Iago is not a man to be consumed with sexual jealousy; though rumors about his wife may hurt his pride, they seem but an excuse for the misery he is about to cause.

Iago's motives could be all of these reasons and more, or they could be none; indeed, Shakespeare leaves the root of Iago's malignancy unexplained, while showing the fruits of his evil in full. Othello's herald enters, to proclaim that the Turks are not going to attack. All should be joyful, and Othello is celebrating the happiness of his recent marriage. Iago and Cassio are on the watch together; Iago gets Cassio to drink, knowing that he cannot hold his liquor.

Iago also tries to coax Cassio's feelings about Desdemona, and make her seem tempting to him; but his intentions are innocent and friendly, so this approach fails. Cassio leaves, and Iago says that he intends to get Cassio drunk, which will hopefully cause a quarrel between Cassio and Roderigo, who has been stirred up against Cassio. Iago wants to see Cassio discredited, so that he may take Cassio's place as lieutenant. Montano and others come, and Iago entertains them with small talk and song; soon, Cassio is drunk, and Roderigo has approached.

Cassio fights offstage with Roderigo, and comes forth, chasing him; Montano tries to hinder Cassio, but Cassio just ends up injuring him. All the noise wakes Othello, who comes down to figure out what has happened. Cassio is stripped of his rank, and all leave Cassio and Iago alone. Cassio laments that he has lost his reputation, which is very dear to him. Iago tries to convince him that a reputation means little; and, if he talks to Desdemona, maybe he can get her to vouch for him with Othello. This will help Iago hint that Desdemona and Cassio are together, which will enrage Othello. Iago then gives a soliloquy about knowing that Desdemona will speak for Cassio, and that he will be able to turn that against them both.

None of the characters in the play have any idea of Iago's plans and evil intentions; Othello and Cassio are especially unaware of this knowledge. Yet, the audience knows exactly what Iago is up to, and is able to see his deceptions for what they are. Tension lies in whether or not Cassio and Othello will come to know as much as the audience does about Iago's deviance. When Othello addresses his wife before a crowd in this scene, his words are all of a financial nature.

His use of the terms "purchase" and "profit" make it seem like Othello is trying to make his diction suitable for the crowd listening to him, and his tone is also less personal and more declarative. Othello's self-consciousness is apparent in these words to Desdemona. It seems that Othello is more interested in keeping up appearances than in showing love for his wife; indeed, he does love her, but he seems unable to allow his love to inhabit a private, personal sphere, apart from his public life and image. Iago begins his attempt to corrupt Cassio in this act, by trying to get him to admit to impure thoughts about Desdemona.

He speaks of Desdemona as being "sport for Jove," and "full of game" II. Iago's tone is highly suggestive and even transparent, but once again, a character is blind to Iago's machinations. Cassio's flawed honor and courtliness are juxtaposed in this scene with Iago's manipulativeness and deceptiveness. Cassio stands in especially sharp contrast to Iago when Iago speaks lustfully of Desdemona; Cassio is full of honor when it comes to women, and the ideals of a courtier as well.

However, Iago strikes gold when he figures out Cassio's weakness for drink; it is this flaw that makes Cassio finally seem human, and tarnishes his golden, polished image. Iago, much more than anyone else in the play, is always aware of what his status and his chances are; he is sharp enough to know when his plans are going to work, and when he needs to change his approach. Perceptiveness is yet another motif in the play; it helps Iago do all of his dirty deeds, yet condemns Othello and Cassio when they cannot muster up enough of it to see that Iago is up to no good. Iago takes advantage of this flaw, and sets the quarrel in motion. When Othello breaks up the quarrel, he asks, "are we turn'd Turks" II. Indeed the Turks are the enemy in Cyprus, but it is interesting that Othello uses language that conveys otherness.

Much like the stereotypes that are hurled his way, Othello contrasts the "barbarous" behavior with the "Christian" brotherhood of the Venetians. His language dehumanizes the Turks and makes them seem animal, echoing Brabantio 's dismissal of Othello in front of the Duke. This is a common tactic in times of war, to foment national pride while denigrating the enemy. However, this isn't war that Othello is in, and things are not as clear-cut in personal battles and politics. Othello considers all of his men in Cyprus to be friends, since they are allies; this is another example of Othello's confusion between the worldly and the personal spheres.

Hence, Iago is again able to successfully misrepresent himself; this time, he pretends that he is there merely to settle the quarrel, when he is the engineer of the whole affair. Cassio mourns the demise of his "reputation" above all else. Iago also knows the importance of reputation, which is why he makes sure that people see him as "honest" above anything else. Cassio tries to find a villain in all that has happened; "invisible spirit of wine Of course, he misses the identity of the real devil in the situation, Iago. Good vs.

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