Reality Television: Is Reality TV Real Or Real?

Saturday, February 19, 2022 10:28:14 AM

Reality Television: Is Reality TV Real Or Real?



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In , according to the Learning and Skills Council , one in seven UK teenagers hoped to gain fame by appearing on reality television. A number of studies have tried to pinpoint the appeal of reality television. A survey by Today. A number of fictional works since the s have contained elements similar to elements of reality television. They tended to be set in a dystopian future, with subjects being recorded against their will and often involved violence. A number of scripted television comedy and satire shows have adopted the format of the documentary-type reality television show, in " mockumentary " style.

Arguably the best-known and most influential such show is the BBC's The Office , which spawned numerous international remakes, including a successful American version. The genre has even encompassed cartoons Drawn Together and Total Drama and a show about puppets The Muppets , The — American sketch comedy series Kroll Show set most of its sketches as excerpts from various fictional reality television shows, which one critic wrote "aren't far off from the lineups at E! Kroll Show executive producer John Levenstein said in an interview that reality TV "has so many tools for telling stories in terms of text and flashbacks and ways to show things to the audience that it's incredibly convenient for comedy and storytelling if you use the full reality show toolkit.

Some feature films have been produced that use some of the conventions of reality television; such films are sometimes referred to as reality films , and sometimes simply as documentaries. The series Jackass spawned five feature films, starting with Jackass: The Movie in In , broadcaster Krishnan Guru-Murthy stated that reality television is "a firm and embedded part of television's vocabulary, used in every genre from game-shows and drama to news and current affairs. The mumblecore film genre, which began in the mids, and uses video cameras and relies heavily on improvisation and non-professional actors, has been described as influenced in part by what one critic called "the spring-break psychodrama of MTV's The Real World ".

Mumblecore director Joe Swanberg has said, "As annoying as reality TV is, it's been really good for filmmakers because it got mainstream audiences used to watching shaky camerawork and different kinds of situations. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Genre of television programming that documents unscripted situations and actual occurrences. For other uses of "Reality Show", see Reality Show disambiguation.

It has been suggested that Criticism of reality television be merged into this article. Discuss Proposed since March Main articles: Court show and Reality legal programming. Further information: paranormal television. Further information: List of reality television programs. This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. May Learn how and when to remove this template message. Further information: Criticism of reality television. Television portal. ISBN In Holmes, and Jermyn, D. London: Routledge, In Ouellette, L. Reality Television Culture. Retrieved May 8, December 21, Retrieved October 17, Quote: "Peter Benchley's journey to the world of the White Shark is an evocative portrait of one of nature's extraordinary phenomena, the shark, and of one man's revealing transition from the world of fantasy to the world of underwater reality. Evening Standard. Archived from the original on December 4, Reality TV: Realism and Revelation. London: Wallflower Press. The New York Times.

Retrieved March 18, Scottish singer Sheena Easton". Daily Record. July 22, San Diego Union-Tribune. NRC Handelsblad in Dutch. USA Today. Washington DC. February Simpson Case Explains Reality in ". Vanity Fair. Retrieved July 17, February 10, Simpson trial". The Washington Post. June 12, October 11, Retrieved from Lexis Nexis database. The World from PRX. February 21, Popular Communication. S2CID You can watch 'The Tester'; Reality series is available only on consoles". Retrieved October 10, The Wrap. Retrieved March 14, New York Magazine Vulture blog. Entertainment Weekly. Media Psychology. Cultural Trends. The O. Lexington Books. The Guardian. Disability and Discourse Analysis. Retrieved July 7, — via Google Books. Retrieved July 7, March 2, Archived from the original on March 7, Retrieved March 6, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

PMID Retrieved April 29, New York Times Knowledge Network. Archived from the original on December 2, Retrieved October 4, Retrieved January 7, Stooges do anything for camera in 'Reality Hell ' ". Boston Herald. Archived from the original on October 4, Retrieved September 1, Retrieved July 26, June 1, Retrieved November 27, August 16, Smith, Andrew F. Landy, Jeffrey M. Retrieved April 26, April 15, Archived from the original on April 10, Retrieved March 13, July 21, Denver Westword. The secrets of 'Survivor' revealed. October 7, Accessed September Chicago Tribune. Martin's Press. Los Angeles Times. Page 2 of 3. Reality TV Magazine. Archived from the original on April 22, Retrieved July 10, Archived from the original on March 1, Retrieved July 16, New York.

ISBN pp. Daily News. International Business Times. BBC News. March 1, The Weekly Standard. Archived from the original on March 11, Retrieved July 11, Lee The Economist. September 8, The Times. Archived from the original on February 8, University of Cambridge. July 5, Archived from the original on March 3, Retrieved July 29, International Herald Tribune. The Atlantic Monthly. Archived from the original on May 26, September 29, Retrieved May 1, April 10, November 20, On channel after channel you see shows with truckers driving across treacherously icy roads in Alaska , two people telling folks what not to wear, and crab fisherman braving a mother of a storm.

Who in the world are New York and Tila Tequila, and why do they have their own shows? Just when did reality TV get to be so popular? And, finally, how do people come up with this stuff -- and how real are these shows anyway? Reality TV has morphed from radio game show and amateur talent competition to hidden camera stunt show to dating show to documentary-style series. In the fall season, there were more than a dozen reality shows in prime-time slots on major networks and cable channels. By definition, reality TV is essentially unscripted programming that doesn't employ actors and focuses on footage of real events or situations.

Reality shows also often use a host to run the show or a narrator to tell the story or set the stage of events that are about to unfold. Unlike scripted shows like sitcoms, dramas and newscasts, reality TV does not rely on writers and actors, and much of the show is run by producers and a team of editors. Because of this, it can be a very affordable programming option from a production standpoint -- and it's why networks are scrambling to add reality content in the wake of the Writers Guild of America strike.

The defining aspect of reality TV is probably the manner in which it is shot. Whether the show takes place in a real setting with real people much like a documentary , shoots in front of a live studio audience that participates in the program, or uses hidden surveillance, reality TV relies on the camera capturing everything as it happens. In this article, we'll learn about what constitutes reality TV today, the types of reality programs, when they got to be so popular -- and if they're all as "real" as they claim to be.

But first, let's take a look at how it all started. A reality show's segment producers or story editors usually assemble storyboards and shooting scripts, important tools for shaping the direction of the show. In the TV sitcom and drama world, these folks would be known as writers. But unlike writers, they're generally not recognized by the Writers Guild of America and so aren't union employees. This distinction could be seen as a disservice to the segment producers and story editors, but it benefits the show in that it lowers production costs -- and it helps preserve the idea that the shows are real and unscripted.

It also allows reality shows to keep on rolling when a writers' strike hits, like it did in fall Many reality show staffers have contested the distinction in ongoing court cases since It didn't matter if the subject was Joe Schmo or Johnny Cash -- they were all surprised by host Ralph Edwards and his camera crew they famously surprised Cash on stage in the middle of a concert. This talent show featured acts that performed for a voting audience. The act with the most votes was invited back the next week.

Another s radio crossover was "Queen for a Day. The studio audience determined the queen via an applause meter. Art Linkletter and Allen Funt brought practical jokes, stunts and hidden surveillance to TV in the '50s. Radio's "Candid Microphone" became "Candid Camera," with Funt hosting and performing practical jokes. The gags and stunts were contrived, but the unsuspecting targets' reactions were very real. Audience members on Linketter's "People are Funny" participated in outrageous skits and gags.

Other early reality shows included "I'd Like to See" and "You Asked for It" , which required audience members to write in or vote for what they'd like to see on the show. The picks were often filmed in a documentary or clip-type style -- shot on location and presented to the audience with a narrator. Shows like "Real People" and "That's Incredible" incorporated similar techniques and were popular in the late s and early '80s. While much of reality TV in the s and '70s continued to revolve around game shows and amateur talent, there were some changes.

Merv Griffin created several new game shows, including "Jeopardy! It has spawned dozens of dating shows. Capitalizing on the success of "The Dating Game," Barris went on to produce other reality shows, including the popular amateur talent series "The Gong Show. Another type of reality show premiered in -- a episode documentary series called "An American Family. TV Guide considers it the first reality show. What a scary meaning for such a small word. Loss comes in all shapes and sizes. Just like us. Just like human beings. A loss sends us into a spiral. An uncontrollable, spirling feeling you feel coming up your throat. Oftentimes, when we experience loss, we beg for the "one mores". One more hug, please.

Can I have one more kiss? Just one more laugh we can share? We wish for these experiences to just happen once more as if that would ever be enough. The reality is that even if we were privileged with one more, we would want another. And another. We'd never be satisfied. We'd eventually just wish for eternity. Loss is necessary. Loss is natural. Loss is inevitable. Loss was never defined as easy. In fact, it has to be hard. It has to be hard for us to remember. To remember those warm embraces, to remember the feeling of their lips on yours, and to remember the smile on their face when you said something funny.

But why are we so afraid of loss after all? We are so blessed to have experienced it to begin with. It means there was a presence of care. That ache in our heart and the deep pit in our stomach means there was something there to fill those vacant voids. The empty spaces were just simply whole. We're all so afraid of change. Change in our love life or our families, change in our friendships and daily routines. One day we will remember that losing someone isn't about learning how to live without them, but to know their presence, and to carry what they left us behind.

For everything we've deeply loved, we cannot lose. They become a part of us. We adapt to the way they talk, we make them a part of our Instagram passwords, we remember when they told us to cook chicken for 20 minutes instead of We as humans are so lucky to meet so many people that will one day leave us. We are so lucky to have the ability and courage to suffer, to grieve, and to wish for a better ending. For that only means, we were lucky enough to love. When Sony announced that Venom would be getting a stand-alone movie, outside of the Tom Holland MCU Spider-Man films, and intended to start its own separate shared universe of films, the reactions were generally not that kind.

Even if Tom Hardy was going to take on the role, why would you take Venom, so intrinsically connected to Spider-Man's comic book roots, and remove all of that for cheap action spectacle? Needless to say I wound up hopping on the "lets bash 'Venom'" train. While I appreciated how much fun Tom Hardy was having and the visual approach to the symbiotes, I couldn't get behind the film's tone or story, both of which felt like relics of a bygone era of comic book storytelling that sacrificed actual pathos for that aforementioned cheap spectacle. But apparently that critical consensus was in the minority because audiences ate the film up. On top of that, Ruben Fleischer would step out of the director's chair in place of Andy Serkis, the visual effects legend behind characters like 'The Lord of the Rings' Gollum and 'Planet of the Apes' Caesar, and a pretty decent director in his own right.

Now with a year-long pandemic delay behind it, 'Venom: Let There Be Carnage' is finally here, did it change my jaded little mind about the character's big-screen worth? Surprisingly, it kind of did. I won't pretend that I loved it by any stretch, but while 'Let There Be Carnage' still features some of its predecessor's shortcomings, there's also a tightness, consistency and self-awareness that's more prevalent this time around; in other words, it's significantly more fun!

A year after the events of the first film, Eddie Brock played by Tom Hardy is struggling with sharing a body with the alien symbiote, Venom also voiced by Hardy. Things change when Eddie is contacted by Detective Pat Mulligan played by Stephen Graham , who says that the serial killer Cletus Kasady will talk only with Eddie regarding his string of murders. His interview with Kasady played by Woody Harrelson leads to Eddie uncovering the killer's victims and confirming Kasady's execution. During their final meeting, Kasady bites Eddie, imprinting part of Venom onto Kasady. When Kasady is executed, the new symbiote awakens, merging with Kasady into a bloody, far more violent incarnation known as Carnage.

It's up to Eddie and Venom to put aside their differences to stop Carnage's rampage, as well as Frances Barrison played by Naomi Harris , Kasady's longtime girlfriend whose sonic scream abilities pose a threat to both Venom and Carnage. So what made me completely switch gears this time around? There's a couple reasons, but first and foremost is the pacing.

Serkis and screenwriter Kelly Marcel know exactly where to take the story and how to frame both Eddie and Venom's journeys against the looming threat of Carnage. Even when the film is going for pure, outrageous humor, it never forgets the qualms between Eddie and Venom should be at the center beyond the obvious comic book-y exhibitions. If you were a fan of Eddie's anxious sense of loss, or the back-and-forth between he and the overly eccentric Venom, you are going to love this movie.

Hardy has a great grasp on what buttons to push for both, especially Venom, who has to spend a chunk of the movie contending with losing Eddie altogether and find their own unique purpose among other things, what is essentially Venom's "coming out" moment that actually finds some weight in all the jokes. Then there's Harrelson as Carnage and he absolutely delivers! Absolutely taking a few cues from Heath Ledger's Joker, Harrelson is leaning just enough into campy territory to be charismatic, but never letting us forget the absolutely shattered malicious mind controlling the spaghetti wrap of CGI. Serkis' directing itself deserves some praise too. I can't necessarily pinpoint his style, but like his approach on 'Mowgli,' he has a great eye for detail in both character aesthetics and worldbuilding.

That goes from the symbiotes' movements and action bits to bigger things like lighting in a church sequence or just making San Francisco feel more alive in the process. As far as downsides go, what you see is basically what you get. While I was certainly on that train more here, I also couldn't help but hope for more on the emotional side of things. Yes, seeing the two be vulnerable with one another is important to their arcs and the comedy infusions work more often than not, but it also presents a double-edged sword of that quick runtime, sacrificing time for smaller moments for bigger, more outrageous ones. In addition, while Hardy and Harrelson are electric together, I also found a lot of the supporting characters disappointing to a degree.

Mulligan has a few neat moments, but not enough to go beyond the tough cop archetype. The only one who almost makes it work is Naomi Harris, who actually has great chemistry with Harrelson until the movie has to do something else with her. It's those other characters that make the non-Venom, non-Carnage moments stall significantly and I wish there was more to them. I wouldn't go so far as to have complete faith in this approach to Sony's characters moving forward — Venom or whatever larger plans are in the works — but I could safely recommend this whatever side of the film spectrum you land on.

This kind of fun genre content is sorely needed and I'm happy I had as good of a time as I did. The sequel to the reboot is an enjoyable, but unremarkable start to the Halloween movie season. There's a reason why the Addams Family have become icons of the American cartoon pantheon although having one of the catchiest theme songs in television history doesn't hinder them. The family of creepy but loveable archetypes have been featured across generations, between the aforementioned show, the duo of Barry Levinson films in the '90s and, most recently, MGM's animated reboot in That project got a mostly mixed reception and, while I'd count me as part of that group, I thought there was more merit to it than I expected.

The characters and animation designs felt kind of unique, and when it surpassed whatever mundane story the writers had in mind to be more macabre, it could be kind of fun. This is to say my reaction wasn't entirely negative when the sequel was announced, as well as just forgetting about it until I got the screening invitation. With that semblance of optimism in mind, does 'The Addams Family 2' improve on the first film's strengths? Unfortunately, not really. There's fun to be had and the film clearly has reverence for its roots, but between the inconsistent humor and lackluster story beats, what we're left with feels just a bit too unexceptional to recommend. Some time after the events of the first film, Wednesday Addams voiced by Chloe Grace Moretz has made an incredible discovery: a way to transfer personality traits from one living being to another.

While she looks to grand ambitions for her education, her parents, Gomez and Morticia voiced by Oscar Isaac and Charlize Theron respectively believe they are losing her and her brother, Pugsley voiced by Javon Walton , as they get older. The solution: a family road trip cross country alongside their Uncle Fester voiced by Nick Kroll and butler Lurch voiced by Conrad Vernon visiting all the great destinations of the United States. Along the way, a subplot begins to unfold with Rupert voiced by Wallace Shawn , a custody lawyer seemingly convinced that Wednesday is not Gomez and Morticia's biological daughter, and the enigmatic scientist, Cyrus Strange voiced by Bill Hader , who takes an interest in Wednesday's potentially terrifying work.

With the exception of Javon Walton replacing Finn Wolfhard, the voice cast returns for the sequel and they're mostly capable here. Oscar Isaac and Charlize Theron embody a lot of Gomez and Morticia's obsessively sincere dynamic it legitimately makes me think they'd be good in live-action and Nick Kroll delivers a bounty of one-liners that are sure to get a laugh here and there.

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